Samantha Winslow

On the heels of one-day strikes, Washington's highest court announced it will start charging a penalty of $100,000 a day for illegally underfunding public schools.

Organizing Is the Key to Surviving Friedrichs

A decision that makes the whole public sector “right to work” could be devastating. But public sector workers didn’t always have legal protection to unionize, bargain, or strike. They won those rights—by organizing without them.

After saving the Affordable Care Act again and protecting same-sex couples' right to marry, the justices ended their term by opting to hear the case that public sector unions have been trying to make go away.

Remember the Hawaii teachers who in 2012 led a statewide work-to-rule campaign against low pay? This spring they won the top three spots in the Hawaii State Teachers Association—but the union’s board of directors is refusing to let them take office.

Teachers and counselors at Los Angeles’ largest charter school chain are thinking big. Instead of unionizing school by school, they’re pushing Alliance College-Ready Charter Schools to agree to ground rules for organizing, without boss interference, at all 26 schools in the chain.

IRS Cuts Protect Wealthy

By underfunding audits, politicians are helping their rich friends get away with tax evasion. The resulting shortfall provides an excuse to weaken government programs they never liked anyway.

Thousands of oil refinery workers are on strike over health and safety. They cite outsourcing, short staffing, and forced overtime that produces dangerous fatigue—in a job where mistakes can be fatal.

Chicago Teachers Force Rahm into a Runoff

On election night the Chicago Teachers Union and its new independent political organization didn’t knock out Mayor Rahm Emanuel—but they did take him down a notch, forcing him into a runoff with the union’s preferred candidate, Jesus “Chuy” Garcia.

Many thought Governor Scott Walker’s anti-union Act 10 would be a death sentence for Wisconsin’s public sector unions. But teacher unions around the state have taken the law’s obstacles and turned them into organizing opportunities.

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