Samantha Winslow

Many thought Governor Scott Walker’s anti-union Act 10 would be a death sentence for Wisconsin’s public sector unions. But teacher unions around the state have taken the law’s obstacles and turned them into organizing opportunities.

The teacher union and its allies are making a bid to channel the spirit and unity of the 2012 strike into unseating “Mayor 1%” and his city council cronies.

Turning the usual rivalries upside down, “virtual teachers” in an online charter school system in California are pushing to unionize.

Even basic rights like free speech can’t be taken for granted, transit workers are finding out, when your speech makes the boss look bad.

Imagine being removed from your workplace for misconduct—without being told what you did wrong. Imagine waiting years to find out whether you can return.

Three Myths of Teacher Tenure

In my five years organizing with non-union health care workers who wanted to join the union, job security was always one of their top issues. But when it comes to teachers having job security, the myths kick in.

Midterm elections were mostly bad news for workers and unions. But when voters saw working-class issues directly on the ballot, like raising the minimum wage or guaranteeing sick leave, they voted for them.

Teacher, student, and parent protests in suburban Denver drew national attention to a battle against curriculum censorship—but it took several blows to come to this point.

Workers at the North Carolina Cummins diesel engine plant won wage increases this summer—even without having a recognized union or majority union support inside their shop.

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