Troublemakers Blog

November 09, 2018 / Samantha Winslow
How did states with high-profile union fights fare in the 2018 midterms? The elections were a mixed bag. »
November 06, 2018 /
My union, the United Federation of Teachers, representing 80,000 active school employees, has reached a new three-year agreement with New York City. It was announced over the weekend that the contract had been approved by an 87 percent vote. The Occupational and Physical Therapists chapter, however, voted it down. »
November 05, 2018 /
Note: Mi Jiuping, one of the central worker-leaders of the Jasic union formation effort in China’s manufacturing hub of Shenzhen, is now a detainee at the Shenzhen Number 2 detention center for his labor activism. »
November 02, 2018 /
Teamsters who package and process raisins for Sun-Maid succeeded in “raisin” their wages with a two-week strike in September. »
November 01, 2018 /
Forty-eight Indianapolis janitors and supporters, including two Indianapolis City-County Council members, were arrested while staging a sit-in October 25 at the intersection next to the corporate headquarters of Eli Lilly, Indiana’s richest corporation. »
October 31, 2018 /
At first glance, one might be forgiven for thinking that A History of America in Ten Strikes is some kind of social-media-driven “listicle” book. »
October 24, 2018 / Chris Brooks
“Put your faith in the rank and file” was the advice that famed longshore union organizer Harry Bridges used to give. But instead of turning to union members for the bold ideas we need, some labor leaders are taking cues from the corporate world. Take the Service Employees (SEIU), which recently posted a job for an “Innovation Specialist.” »
October 22, 2018 /
Taxi drivers, nurses, construction workers, teachers, UPS workers, musicians, Verizon line workers, journalists—you name it, they were there. »
October 15, 2018 /
Teachers across the country this year are breathing new life into the strike—galvanizing members and winning gains. »
October 11, 2018 /
“Power concedes nothing without a demand,” abolitionist leader Frederick Douglass declared 161 years ago. Last week saw that truth on broad display as Amazon, facing growing political and organizing pressure, announced it was setting a minimum wage of $15 an hour for its U.S. workforce and also raising wages in England. »

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